Homemade Matcha Ice Cream

When I was a child, a friend of my father owned a local farm. They had their own creamery onsite and made ice cream from milk produced on the farm. Each time when we got ice cream as gifts from this uncle, it was my happiest day. That ice cream was thick and creamy, stronger on the milky flavor than on the sugary taste. Now after I started making my own ice cream at home, I learned about various bases with different textures and tastes. The New York style is made from cream and eggs, while the Philadelphia style is made without eggs. Although I have made some nice strawberry ice cream without eggs, we all favor the rich and creamy type of ice cream made from the egg-based custard.

This basic vanilla ice cream recipe using whole eggs is my favorite. Most of custard-based recipes call for egg yolks, which leave me with egg whites that I have to find ways to use up. Because this recipe is simple and easy, I make ice cream regularly at home throughout the year and enjoy both the process and the product.

This recipe is also versatile. By adding various ingredients (such as nuts, fruits) to the base, a new flavor can be created without adding much preparation time. This week when I asked for ice cream ideas, RK said “Vanilla!”, and AK said “Matcha!”. I was able to make two flavors on the same day without causing any unnecessary competition at home. I will call that a success.

Matcha is one type of Japanese green tea that was grown and prepared through special processes. Matcha has its unique bitter yet refreshing taste and many health benefits. AK one day tried some hot Matcha tea and did not particularly like it. But he asked for Matcha Ice Cream and liked it.

Jump to Recipe

Homemade Matcha Ice Cream

A homemade ice cream with refreshing Matcha flavor. It is custard-based using whole eggs.
Prep Time1 d
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Homemade Ice Cream, Homemade Matcha Ice Cream, Whole egg ice cream
Servings: 4 people
Author: Isabel Wang
Cost: $5

Equipment

  • Ice cream maker, 1.5 QT
  • Stainless steel pot

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Matcha powder Pure powder, non-sweetened
  • 3 cups Heavy cream
  • 1 cup Whole milk
  • 3 Large eggs
  • 1 cup Brown sugar
  • 1 tsp Pure vanilla extract

Instructions

Preparation

  • Chill the bowl of ice cream maker in freezer for at least 24 hours

Ice cream custard

  • Heat up heavy cream and milk in the pot until steaming; don't let it boil
  • Stir in sugar until it dissolves
  • In a separate bowl, beat the eggs
  • Slowly add 2 cups of hot cream/milk into the eggs while continuously mixing
  • Slowly pour the egg/cream mixture back to the pot while mixing
  • Heat the custard on medium while stirring continuously; do not let it boil; for about 3 minutes
  • The custard base will thicken; remove from stove once the base is thick enough to form a thin and consistent coat on the back of the spoon
  • Stir in vanilla extract and matcha powder
  • Chill the custard in refrigerator for 4 hours to overnight

Making ice cream

  • Start the ice cream maker
  • Pour in custard and churn for 20 minutues
  • Serve the ice cream soft, or freeze it for at least 4 hours for a firmer texture

Notes

  1. This time I divided the custard bases into two. The first half was made into vanilla ice cream, and the second half was mixed with matcha powder for Matcha Ice Cream.
  2. I tried different brands of pure matcha powder, and they all taste good. Different brands give various strength of taste and the amount needs to be adjusted. For the organic matcha powder I used this time, I used 3 grams in 3 cups of custard.
  3. I owned the 1.5 QT Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker for about 4 years and used it at least once a month. It has been working well. Any ice cream maker should work. Some of my friends had trouble making ice cream in a maker. In my opinion, the most critical thing is to chill the bowl for at least 24 hours. When I make two batches, the second batch would be a little bit softer, but will be fluffy enough. In the past, the boys were in a hurry and I took the bowl out before it was chilled for 24 hours, and the ice cream custard just did not freeze. 

About the Author Isabel Wang, MD/PhD

I received my MD from PUMC in Beijing China and my Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Stony Brook University on Long Island. Over the years, I have worked in the fields of genetic research and clinical medicine in different parts of the US, including PA, MO, CT, FL, NY and MI. My research has been published in multiple scientific journals. Currently I live in Ann Arbor, MI with my husband and our children and Mango the orange tabby. I love hiking, running, baking, cooking and biking.

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